AC W10 Generations mixing and matching 4 generations in the workplace

AC W10 Generations mixing and matching 4 generations in the workplace

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     Greg Hammill is currently      director, inter and student      programs, at FDU’s Silber-      man College of Business.             Prior to his current position,      he was executive director of      FDU’s Center for Human      Resource Management      Studies (CHRMS).      Hammill was director of      1990s, when he recognized      the need to develop an un-      derstanding of generational      differences to assist in the      hiring and retention of      managers. He explains,      “Hiring began to take on a      new look as Internet re-      cruiting was introduced      and as the interview      training required by hiring      managers changed. With-      out understanding charac-      teristics of the generations,      it was impossible to under-      stand why recent college      graduates were not in-      terested in employment at      their 40s and 50s were      Before coming to Fairleigh      Dickinson, Hammill was the      chief operating officer of      Talent Alliance, Morris-      town, N.J., where he over-      saw career development      software support and      Web design.      At Silberman College of      Business, Hammill strives      to foster a partnership be-      tween education and in-      dustry to provide learning      opportunities for students in      the Joint Global MBA      Program FDU has with the      Institute of Management      Technology (IMT) in India.  http://www.fdu.edu/newspubs/magazine/05ws/generatio ns.htm     retrieved March 11, 2010 Think of the last time you heard comments like these …  You’re right, but I’m the boss! Just do your job! I remember when … The kid wants a promotion after six months on the job! No! How did you react? Were you offended? Were you okay with the comment? Did you understand, or not understand, why someone would say these words? The words and your reaction, as well as the reactions of others, reflect generational differences in the workplace. If you don’t think generation makes a difference, think of this example. When asked to recall how and where Kennedy died, the Veterans and Baby 1
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Boomers would say gunshots in Dallas, Texas; Generation X remembers a plane crash near Martha’s Vineyard, Mass.; and Generation Y might say, “Kennedy who?” There is a serious new problem in the workplace, and it has nothing to do with downsizing, global competition, pointy-haired bosses, stress or greed. Instead, it is the problem of distinct generations — the Veterans, the Baby
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AC W10 Generations mixing and matching 4 generations in the workplace

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