Ac Stereotypes Media Girls Gone Wild

Ac Stereotypes Media Girls Gone Wild - Girls Gone Wild:...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Girls Gone Wild: What Are Celebs Teaching Kids?  underwear. Tweens adore them and teens envy them. But are we raising a generation of  'prosti-tots'? By Kathleen Deveny with Raina Kelley Newsweek Feb. 12, 2007 issue - My 6-year-old daughter loves Lindsay Lohan. Loves, loves,  loves  her. She loves  Lindsay's hair; she loves Lindsay's freckles. She's seen "The Parent Trap" at least 10 times. I sometimes  catch her humming the movie's theme song, Nat King Cole's "Love." She likes "Herbie Fully Loaded" and  now we're cycling through "Freaky Friday." So when my daughter spotted a photo of Lindsay in the New  York Post at the breakfast table not long ago, she was psyched. "That's Lindsay Lohan," she said proudly.  "What's she doing?" I couldn't tell her, of course. I didn't want to explain that Lindsay, who, like Paris Hilton and Britney Spears,  sometimes parties pantyless, was taking pole-dancing lessons to prepare for a movie role. Or that her two  hours of research left her bruised "everywhere." Then again, Lindsay's professional trials are easy to explain  compared with Nicole Richie's recent decision to stop her car in the car-pool lane of an L.A. freeway. Or  Britney Spears's "collapse" during a New Year's Eve party in Las Vegas. Or the more recent report that  Lindsay had checked into rehab after passing out in a hotel hallway, an item that ran on the Post's Page Six  opposite a photo of Kate Moss falling down a stairway while dressed in little more than a fur jacket and a  pack of cigarettes. Something's in the air, and I wouldn't call it love. Like never before, our kids are being bombarded by images  of oversexed, underdressed celebrities who can't seem to step out of a car without displaying their well- waxed private parts to photographers. Videos like "Girls Gone Wild on Campus Uncensored" bring in an  estimated $40 million a year. And if US magazine, which changed the rules of mainstream celebrity  journalism, is too slow with the latest dish on "Brit's New Man," kids can catch up 24/7 with hugely popular  gossip blogs like perezhilton.com, tmz.com or defamer.com. Allow us to confirm what every parent knows: kids, born in the new-media petri dish, are well aware of  celebrity antics. But while boys are willing to take a peek at anyone showing skin, they're baffled by the  feuds, the fashions and faux pas of the Brit Pack. Girls, on the other hand, are their biggest fans. A recent  NEWSWEEK Poll found that 77 percent of Americans believe that Britney, Paris and Lindsay have too much 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/21/2012 for the course COMM 1000345 taught by Professor Mccloud during the Fall '10 term at Mohawk College.

Page1 / 8

Ac Stereotypes Media Girls Gone Wild - Girls Gone Wild:...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online