AC W10 Stereotypes self selecting what we know

AC W10 Stereotypes self selecting what we know - March 7,...

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Unformatted text preview: March 7, 2010 www.globeandmail.com Self-selecting what we know By Lisan Jutras Globe and Mail Update The Net is where we go to seek out our tribe - and that can shrink our world view (Does this tendency contribute to the dumbest generation?) I have a friend who believes that the popularity of Nickelback- as evidenced by the band playing on the world's stage at our Olympic ceremonies - foretells the end of the world. "But people don't love them!" I said. "Everybody hates them!" "Everybody," of course, wasn't strictly accurate, although that was how it felt in the moment. And, well, okay, I had to fend off doomsday feelings myself. "Everybody" meant everyone I knew on Facebook. And Twitter. ("Pieces of bird poop stuck on cars is better than Nickelback," read one tweet.) When you want to take the public's pulse on an issue, the Web seems the logical place to go. Not only are people increasingly turning to Internet sources for their news, but a study last week from the Pew Internet and American Life Project shows that, of people who do get it online, 75 per cent have...
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This note was uploaded on 03/21/2012 for the course COMM 1000345 taught by Professor Mccloud during the Fall '10 term at Mohawk College.

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AC W10 Stereotypes self selecting what we know - March 7,...

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