AC Gender Issues Coming Out in Middle School nytimes sept. 09

AC Gender Issues Coming Out in Middle School nytimes sept. 09

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Unformatted text preview: September 27, 2009 www.nytimes.com Coming Out in Middle School By BENOIT DENIZET-LEWIS Austin didnt know what to wear to his first gay dance last spring. It was bad enough that the gangly 13-year-old from Sand Springs, Okla., had to go without his boyfriend at the time, a 14-year-old star athlete at another middle school, but there were also laundry issues. I dont have any clean clothes! he complained to me by text message, his favored method of communication. When I met up with him an hour later, he had weathered his wardrobe crisis (he was in jeans and a beige T-shirt with musical instruments on it) but was still a nervous wreck. Im kind of scared, he confessed. Who am I going to talk to? I wish my boyfriend could come. But his boyfriend couldnt find anyone to give him a ride nor, Austin explained, could his boyfriend ask his father for one. His dad would give him up for adoption if he knew he was gay, Austin told me. Im serious. He has the strictest, scariest dad ever. He has to date girls and act all tough so that people wont suspect. Austin doesnt have to play the pretend game, as he calls it, anymore. At his middle school, he has come out to his close friends, who have been supportive. A few of his female friends responded that they were bisexual. Half the girls I know are bisexual, he said. He hadnt planned on coming out to his mom yet, but she found out a week before the dance. I told my cousin, my cousin told this other girl, she told her mother, her mother told my mom and then my mom told me, Austin explained. The only person who really has a problem with it is my older sister, who keeps saying: Its just a phase! Its just a phase! Austins mom was on vacation in another state during my visit to Oklahoma, so a family friend drove him to the weekly youth dance at the Openarms Youth Project in Tulsa, which is housed in a white cement-block building next to a redbrick Baptist church on the east side of town. We arrived unfashionably on time, and Austin tried to park himself on a couch in a corner but was whisked away by Ben, a 16-year-old Openarms regular, who gave him an impromptu tour and introduced him to his mom, who works the concession area most weeks....
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This note was uploaded on 03/21/2012 for the course COMM 1000345 taught by Professor Mccloud during the Fall '10 term at Mohawk College.

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AC Gender Issues Coming Out in Middle School nytimes sept. 09

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