Chapter4.3-4 - Taylor series expansion of f=cos(x) about...

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Unformatted text preview: Taylor series expansion of f=cos(x) about x=0. f '(0) = - sin(0) = 0, f (3) (0) = sin(0) = 0, f "(0) = - cos(0) = -1 f (4) (0) = cos(0) = 1, etc. So Taylor series expansion is (as given in Problem 4.10) cos( x) = 1 - x 2 x 4 x 6 x8 + - + + 2! 4! 6! 8! An mfile that calculates this approximation with n terms is function apx=costaylor(x,n) %Calculates the Maclaurin series approximaton to cos(x) using the first n %terms in the expansion. apx=0; for i=0:n1 apx=apx+(1)^i*x^(2*i)/factorial(2*i); end Problem 4.10 asks us to increment n from 1 until the approximate error indicates that we have accuracy to two significant digits for x=pi/3. We start with >> a1=costaylor(pi/3,1) a1 = 1 >> a2=costaylor(pi/3,2) a2 = 0.4517 With cos(pi/3)=0.5, the true error in a1 is 100% and in a2 it is >> true2=(a20.5)/0.5*100 true2 = 9.6623 That is about 9.7%. The approximate error, though is >> aprerror=(a1a2)/a2*100 aprerror = 121.3914% With one more term we get >> a3=costaylor(pi/3,3) a3 = 0.5018 >> true3=(a30.5)/0.5*100 true3 = 0.3592 >> aprerror=(a2a3)/a3*100 aprerror = 9.9856 So the actual error is only 0.36% while the estimated is 10%. Finally with a fourth term >> a4=costaylor(pi/3,4) a4 = 0.5000 >> true4=(a40.5)/0.5*100 true4 = 0.0071 >> aprerror=(a3a4)/a4*100 aprerror = 0.3664 The true error is less than one percent of one percent, the approximate error is 0.37% so we have at least two significant digits and we stop. Total error: The difficulty of finding a good step size for differentiation is particularly acute when solving illconditioned equations. For example, Consider the system: 10001u + xv = 1000 , xu + 10000v = 1000 . For x=10,000 the determinant is almost zero. The system is ill conditioned, and it is hard to find a good step size for calculating derivatives with respect to x. One of my graduate students ran into difficulties calculating derivatives of the deformation of a car model seen below With respect to variables that define the dimensions of the car. ...
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This note was uploaded on 03/27/2012 for the course EGM 3344 taught by Professor Raphaelhaftka during the Spring '09 term at University of Florida.

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