{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Compressive Strength Presentation

Compressive Strength Presentation - Compressive strength of...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Compressive strength of unidirectional composites: evaluation and comparison of prediction models N.K. Naik, Rajesh S. Kumar Eduardo Rondon EAS 6939
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Introduction Study of composites is a relatively new branch of Engineering Micromechanics dates back to the 1960s with research such as that which led to Rosen’s compressive strength predictions in 1965 Although much is well-understood, much research continues on modeling compressive strength Many factors govern compressive failure (e.g. layup, loading) Because of this, empirical models are often developed around experimental data sets
Image of page 2
Introduction Although many models are present, few have been compared Since predictions are so empirical, they depend highly on their test results. Th l f h d ll d l The goal of this study was to compare all models to a common data set Ideally one would find a predictive method that is both Ideally, one would find a predictive method that is both accurate and simple
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Introduction Often in composites, failure is determined by compressive stresses (compressive strength is lower than tensile strength) Compression also comes hand in hand with buckling (global or local) Failure under compressive loading is defined as failure of the material without the specimen buckling or any other global defect triggering the mechanism
Image of page 4
Th Th C i F il M d The Three Compressive Failure Modes Microbuckling is the buckling of fibers within the matrix. Can happen out of phase (extensional microbuckling) or in phase (shear microbuckling)
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Th Th C i F il M d The Three Compressive Failure Modes Kinking is highly localized fiber buckling. It is only occurs after microbuckling has already developed after the attainment of a peak compressive load when the region
Image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
  • Spring '11
  • Staff
  • Strength of materials, Shear strength, Composite material, Compressive stress, Compressive strength, Three C Th Th Compressive F

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern