Soc183week 2 Hannah Lecture Notes Part 2

Soc183week 2 Hannah Lecture Notes Part 2 - Session 2: On...

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Session 2: On the Meaning of Race Agenda 1. Introductions 2. Sectioning 3. Discussion Leading 4. Short Introductory Lecture 5. What is Race? 6. Biology and Race 7. The Enduring Power of Race 8. The Readings Snipp, Feldman, Morning, Koenig, Wimmer, Brubaker
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Definition of Race and Ethnicity, Continued
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Clarence Gravlee (2009) “How race Becomes Biology: Embodiment of Social Inequality” American Journal of Physical Anthropology 139:47-57 “If race is not biology, some may ask, why are there such clear differences among racially defined groups in a range of biological phenomena?” How does race become biology? 1. Sociocultural reality of race and racism has biological consequences 2. Racial inequalities in health reinforce public understandings of race as biology This forms a vicious cycle: social inequality shapes the biology of racialized groups, and embodied inequalities perpetuate a racialized view of human biology In other words, there is a social pathway of lived experience with regard to race. This can lead to differences in health, and these differences in health are then seen as biological rather than social
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Does Race Equal Human Genetic Variation? The argument against: 1. Most human genetic variation is clinal, that is, there are seldom clear genetic boundaries between populations 2. Most human genetic variation is non-concordant, that is, the traits we use to distinguish races have no value in predicting other aspects of biology. We can not predict blood pressure by measuring texture of hair. 3. There is more genetic variation within groups than between them. The Argument in favor:
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This note was uploaded on 03/27/2012 for the course SOC 183 taught by Professor Sethhannah during the Fall '11 term at Harvard.

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Soc183week 2 Hannah Lecture Notes Part 2 - Session 2: On...

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