power ic w2 - Essential grammar 重重重重重重 01...

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Unformatted text preview: Essential grammar 重重重重重重 01 Contents: 8 parts of speech Relative pronouns Tense Active and passive voice http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/730/01/ English – 8 parts of speech 八八八八 1. Noun 2. Pronoun 3. Adjective / Article 4. Adverb 5. Verb 6. Preposition 7. Conjunction 8. Interjection 1. Noun 八八 A noun is a word that denotes a person, place, or thing. In a sentence, nouns answer the questions who and what . Proper noun Common noun : Count noun – singular / plural Noncount / mass noun Collective noun Nouns with Adjectives 可可 普普普普 ( 普普普 普普 ) a/an, the, no this / that each / every many, several a number of one of the a couple of few 普普普普 (family, people, team) 可可可 普普普普 (Wall Street, July) ( 普普普普普普普 ) the, this, that, no much A great deal of little 普普普普 (water, air, furniture) 普普普普 (beauty, health, anger) Noun and Article a, an the this that these those no article Count singular Count plural Noncount Count and Noncount Nouns with Adjectives Most of the time, this doesn't matter with adjectives. For example, you can say, "The cat was gray" or "The air was gray." However, the difference between a countable and uncountable noun does matter with certain adjectives, such as "some/any," "much/many," and "little/few.“ Some/Any- countable and uncountable nouns. There is some water on the floor. There are some Mexicans here. Do you have any food ? Do you have any apples ? Much/Many : Much- modifies only uncountable nouns. Many- modifies only countable nouns. We don't have much time to get this done. Many Americans travel to Europe. Little/Few : Little - modifies only uncountable nouns. (a little/very little) Few - modifies only countable nouns. He had little food in the house. The doctor had little time to think in the emergency room. There are few doctors in town. Few students like exams. Other basic rules: A lot of/lots of : A lot of/lots of are informal substitutes for much and many . They are used with uncountable nouns when they mean much and with countable nouns when they mean many . They have lots of (much) money in the bank. A lot of (many) Americans travel to Europe. We got lots of (many) mosquitoes last summer. We got lots of (much) rain last summer. A little bit of: A little bit of is informal and always precedes an uncountable noun. There is a little bit of pepper in the soup. There is a little bit of snow on the ground. Enough : Enough modifies both countable and uncountable nouns. There is enough money to buy a car. I have enough books to read. Plenty of : Plenty of modifies both countable and uncountable nouns....
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This note was uploaded on 03/10/2012 for the course EECS 101 taught by Professor Hero during the Spring '11 term at National Taipei University.

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power ic w2 - Essential grammar 重重重重重重 01...

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