W9 handout - Transitional words and phrases Contents:...

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Transitional words and phrases 轉轉轉轉
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Contents: Common mistakes Transition signals Paragraph coherence Appositives
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Transition signals
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Three types of Transition signals 1. Sentence Connectors 2. Clause connectors (coordinating conjunctions & subordinating conjunctions) 3. Others
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1. Sentence Connectors Transition phrases : Appear in the beginning, middle, or end of a sentence. A coma is needed. Example: For example , the Baltic Sea (, for example) in Northern Europe is only one-fourth as saline as the Rea Sea in the Middle East (, for example).
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Often used with a semicolon and a comma to join two independent clauses. Examples: In warm climate zones, water evaporates rapidly ; therefore , its net profit declined. Some English words do not have exact equivalents in other languages ; for example , there is no German word for the adjective fair , as in fair play . Conjunction Adverbs :
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Coordinating conjunctions 對對對對 : used with a comma to join two independent clauses and to form a compound sentence. Examples: In a matriarchy, the mother is the head of the family , and all of the children belong to her clan. In warm climate zones, water evaporates , so the concentration of salt is greater. 2. Clause Connectors
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Yet and But an opposite idea is coming. Yet : preferred when the 2 nd clause is an unexpected or surprising contrast to the 1 st clause. But : preferred when the 2 clauses are direct oppositions. Yet is similar in meaning to nevertheless ; but is similar to however . Examples: Thomas Edison dropped out of school at age 12 , yet he became a famous inventor. I want to study art , but my parents want me to become an engineer. Yet and But :
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Used to introduce a dependent clause, which is joined to form a complex sentence. Position: use a comma if the DC comes before the IC; do not use a comma if the DC comes after the IC. Examples: Although the company’s sale increased last year , its net profit declined. The company’s net profit declined last year although its sales increased. Subordinating conjunctions 對對對對
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Indicating transition : additional (adj.); despite (prep.); examples (n.). Examples: An additional reason for the firm’s bankruptcy was the lack of competent management. Examples of
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This note was uploaded on 03/10/2012 for the course EECS 101 taught by Professor Hero during the Spring '11 term at National Taipei University.

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W9 handout - Transitional words and phrases Contents:...

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