W11 - punctuations and graphs - handout

W11 - punctuations and graphs - handout - Punctuations Week...

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Punctuations Week 11 Peiling Hsia
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Contents: Punctuations Describing graphs and tables Enumeration Writing numbers
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Punctuation Periods . Commas , Colons : Semicolons ; Question marks ? Exclamation points ! Apostrophes ' Quotation marks " " Hyphens - Dashes -- Parentheses ( ) Brackets [ ]
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Semicolon The semicolon ( ; ) is an important punctuation mark in English and has several uses; it is particularly common in formal and/or academic writing. There are several common ways of using the semicolon. 1. Use a semicolon to connect sentences that have closely related ideas. 2. Use a semicolon to connect items in lists if the items in the lists contain commas. 3. When sentences are connected by using conjunctive adverbs , the semicolon comes at the end of the first sentence.
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1. Use a semicolon to connect sentences that have closely related ideas . Examples: He came ; he saw ; he conquered. She always does her best ; that's one reason everyone admires her. Dave Johnson and his family recently visited a village near Chiangmai, Thailand ; Dave's wife, May, comes from there. Almost everyone has heard of the Time Square of New York City ; it's one of the most famous tourist attractions in the U.S.A. John and his wife are newlyweds ; they got married only a few days ago.
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Special notes 1. Periods could also be used for these sentences, but the semicolons emphasize how closely related the sentences are . (If periods are used, the sentences seem "choppy.") 2. Commas cannot be used to join sentences like the above. 3. Note that when a semicolon is used to join closely related sentences, a lower case (small) letter follows the semicolon, not a capital letter. 4. Most authorities state that when a semicolon is used with parentheses (( )) or with quotation marks (" "), the semicolon should be outside the parentheses or quotation marks: Bill said, "I was born in a very small town" ; he went on to say that it's a friendly place with a population of less than 1,000. Ms. Jones was probably referring to the state of Washington (which is in the north-western U.S.) ; a reference to Washington, D.C. doesn't seem very logical to me.
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2. Use a semicolon to connect items in lists if the items in the lists contain commas . Examples: She's lived in San Antonio, Dallas, and Irving, Texas ; Palms, West Los Angeles, and Brentwood, California ; Arch Cape and Portland, Oregon ; and Phoenix, Arizona. We invited Bob's girlfriend, Annie ; Judy, Ahmed, and Simon ; Simon's cousins, Hugo and Peter ; our next-door neighbor, Tina, and her husband ; and three or four other people. For the class you'll need two diskettes, either formatted or unformatted ; paper, both for the printer and for your class notes ; and, of course, the textbook.
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Special notes 1. Semicolons are very helpful, in sentences such as the ones above, in making the lists less confusing. Without the semicolons, the items in the list would be difficult to
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This note was uploaded on 03/10/2012 for the course EECS 101 taught by Professor Hero during the Spring '11 term at National Taipei University.

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W11 - punctuations and graphs - handout - Punctuations Week...

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