global - Going Global Think Global Act Local Get to know...

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Unformatted text preview: Going Global Think Global Act Local Get to know the country and culture Look at material already prepared by other public relations groups Look to others with knowledge of the country and culture Know the business issues Do your homework Twice Then get local help Information Adicional Know the geography Know the history Meet the People Learn the language Learn about your target audience Get help Know limitations Electronic media Education level Look for friends Foreign Press Corp Local press clubs National Public Radio Work trade shows Remember to work both ways Know your place Watch your language Read, read and reread Watch your translation Know spatial requirements/limitations information supplmentaire Be respectful of culture Check for local taboos Translations Scandinavian vacuum manufacturer Electrolux used the following in an American ad campaign: "Nothing sucks like an Electrolux." When General Motors introduced the Chevy Nova in South America, it was apparently unaware that "no va" means "it won't go." After the company figured out why it wasn't selling any cars, it renamed the car in its Spanish markets to the Caribe. Translations Ford had a similar problem in Brazil when the Pinto flopped. The company found out that Pinto was Brazilian slang for "tiny male genitals". Ford pried all the nameplates off and substituted Corcel, which means horse. Translations When Parker Pen marketed a ballpoint pen in Mexico, its ads were supposed to say "It won't leak in your pocket and embarrass you." However, the company's mistakenly thought the Spanish word "embarazar" meant embarrass. Instead the ads said that "It wont leak in your pocket and make you pregnant." Translations The name CocaCola in China was first rendered as Kekoukela. Unfortunately, the Coke company did not discover until after thousands of signs had been printed that the phrase means "bite the wax tadpole" or "female horse stuffed with wax" depending on the dialect. Coke then researched 40,000 Chinese characters and found a close phonetic equivalent, "kokoukole," which can be loosely Integrated MarCom Working together with Marketing and Advertising Reinforce brand position Build marketplace excitement before ad campaign breaks Reviving brand excitement Build personal relationships with customers Advertising and Media Relations The Fall of Advertising and the Rise of PR Al and Laura Ries Why do advertising and marketing need PR? PR has credibility, advertising does not PR provides the positive perceptions that an advertising campaign, if properly directed, can exploit Any new marketing program should start with publicity and shift to advertising only after the PR objectives have been achieved. Advertising and Media Relations PR is not the same as advertising, but they should work together Advertising should follow PR in both timing and theme Advertising is a continuation of PR by other means The theme of the advertising program should repeat the perceptions created in the mind of the target audience by the PR campaign Advertising and Media Relations Advertising is the wind, PR is the sun You cannot force your way into the prospect's mind Advertising is spatial, PR is linear In a linear program, elements unfold over time Advertising uses the Big Bang, PR uses the Slow Buildup Advertising is visual, PR is verbal Advertising and PR Advertising dies, PR lives Yesterday's ad may be useless, but a good story lives forever Advertising is expensive, PR is inexpensive Advertising is funny, PR is serious Advertising is incredible, PR is credible Advertising is brand maintenance, PR is brand building ...
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This note was uploaded on 03/21/2012 for the course MARKETING 114 taught by Professor Handy during the Spring '12 term at University of Central Oklahoma.

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