1013Chapter 5and 6 Summary and Objectives

1013Chapter 5and 6 Summary and Objectives - Chapter 5...

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Chapter 5 Summary Magazines, a favorite of 18th-century British elite, made an easy transition to colonial America. Mass circulation magazines prospered in the post–Civil War years because of increased literacy, improved transportation, reduced postal costs, and lower cover prices. Magazines' large readership and financial health empowered the muckrakers to challenge society's powerful. Television changed magazines from mass circulation to specialized media; as a result, they are attractive to advertisers because of their demographic specificity, reader engagement, and reader affinity for the advertising they carry. The three broad categories of magazines are trade, professional, and business; industrial, company, and sponsored; and consumer magazines. Magazine circulation comes in the form of subscription, single-copy sales, and controlled circulation. Advertiser demands for better measures of readership and accountability may render circulation an outmoded metric. Online magazines, while flourishing in number, have yet to reap significant profits. Custom publishing, in the form of brand magazines and magalogues, is one way that magazines stand out in a cluttered media environment. Magazines further meet competition from other media, especially cable television,
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1013Chapter 5and 6 Summary and Objectives - Chapter 5...

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