LS2.Lecture10.motorcontrol

LS2.Lecture10.motorcontrol - LS2 Muscle: mechanics and...

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LS2 Muscle: mechanics and motor control Prof. George V. Lauder Office Hours: Friday 2-3+ (after class) and by appointment. Today: We focus on the control of movement. ***focus on material that explains in more detail topics covered in lecture*** Assigned Reading for this week: Custom text, pp. 274-316 (green page #s)
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Lecture outline Mechanics: the force – velocity curve Types of muscle: skeletal, cardiac, and smooth (very briefly) Muscle fiber types and recruitment Reflexes Sensing muscle length and force Golgi tendon organs and muscle spindles Muscle use in vivo - - (also note the upcoming lab on this topic) Electromyography Complex functional roles of muscles in the body
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Whole muscle mechanics Flash animation: contractile physiology
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Types of muscle
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Types of muscle: smooth muscle (efferent) autonomic nerve (efferent) autonomic nerve varicosities with synaptic vesicles Sheet of smooth muscle cells smooth muscle cell
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Thick (myosin-based) and thin (actin-based) filaments, biochemically similar to those in skeletal muscle fibers, interact to cause smooth muscle contraction. Types of muscle: smooth muscle
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Types of muscle: cardiac muscle Cardiac muscle cells are electrically connected.
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Basic striated muscle design
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Basic striated muscle design
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Flexors and extensors work in antagonistic sets to refine movement, and to allow force generation in two opposite directions. Basic striated muscle design Flexors and extensors are often co-activated to stabilize joints
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Muscle fiber types and recruitment
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Muscle fiber types and recruitment 2 motor units
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Muscle fiber types and recruitment
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Muscle fiber types and recruitment
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red White Intermediate Muscle fiber types and recruitment
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Muscle fiber types and recruitment: very clearly shown in fish Fish muscle has been a model system for studying muscle recruitment patterns due to the spatial segregation of muscle fiber types.
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Muscle fiber types and recruitment
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LS2.Lecture10.motorcontrol - LS2 Muscle: mechanics and...

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