Partial Pressures of Gases

Partial Pressures of Gases -...

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Unformatted text preview: Partial
Pressures
of
Gases
 
 Applicable
Laws
of
Physics
 Dalton’s
Law
–
In
a
mixture
of
gases,
the
pressure
each
gas
exerts
is
independent
of
 the
pressure
the
others
exert;
in
other
words,
each
gas
in
a
mixture
exerts
pressure
 as
if
no
other
gases
were
present.

 Henry’s
Law
–
The
amount
of
gas
dissolved
in
a
liquid
will
be
directly
proportional
 to
the
partial
pressure
of
that
gas
in
equilibrium
with
that
liquid.

One
consequence
 is
that
at
equilibrium,
the
partial
pressures
of
the
gas
molecules
in
the
liquid
and
 gaseous
phases
must
be
identical.
 
 Important
Notes
 ‐ ‐ ‐ Within
a
liquid,
dissolved
gas
molecules
will
diffuse
from
an
area
of
higher
 partial
pressure
to
an
area
of
lower
partial
pressure.
 When
a
gas
is
in
equilibrium
with
a
liquid,
the
concentration
of
the
gas
is
 proportional
to
its
partial
pressure
as
well
as
its
solubility
in
the
liquid.

The
 more
soluble
the
gas,
the
greater
its
concentration
will
be
at
any
given
partial
 pressure.
 If
some
oxygen
becomes
bound
to
hemoglobin,
then
it
does
not
contribute
to
 the
partial
pressure
of
the
remaining
oxygen
in
solution
in
the
blood.
 ...
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