Design of Concrete Parking - Concrete Parking This...

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Concrete Parking This presentation will rely on the use of ACI 330R – 01 to develop the criteria required to design Concrete Parking Lots and Drives. A pdf copy of ACI is available for student use. Please refer to this document as your course work is identified. 1 A student should read ACI 330R-1 in its entirety prior to beginning the design of a proposed parking area, and in preparation for the lecture and assignments. This reading will facilitate a better understanding of the procedures as they are discussed. E. Raymond DesOrmeaux E. Raymond DesOrmeaux P.E. F. ASCE P.E.
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Concrete Parking h The design of concrete parking and drives is centered upon resisting the tensile stresses caused by vehicular loads. h Stresses are greatest at pavement edges h Consider a thickened edge at perimeter of parking area. A 1/2 2 increase in depth for a sloped horizontal distance of 18” is good h Stresses are less at interior joints resulting from load transfer provided by the joints. Type of joints are important h Thickness design does not alter thermal stresses (contraction or expansion) in the concrete. Therefore, must be an important consideration.
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Concrete Parking 1. What is the anticipated vehicular use? a. Parking only for autos b. Will trucks be allowed? c. Is it an entry for such as delivery vehicles? 2. Can the subgrade support the loads, or will a sub-base be required? (The relative bearing capacity expressed in terms of modulus of subgrade reaction k , CBR, resistance value R, & SSV should be determined.) See Table 2.1 p. 5 The use of Table 2.2 may be necessary to determine the type of base that should be used. 3 3 . Review Table 2.2 Modulus of Subgrade Reaction If the only reason to use base material is to increase the k value, then consider increasing the thickness of concrete. Ordinarily, (and sometimes with controversy) base material is not required unless sub- grade values are very poor, and/or loading conditions are very heavy. 4. There is no substitute for a site visit, both to an Owner’s current facility to view
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Design of Concrete Parking - Concrete Parking This...

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