ACCT2542 - Task: Write an extended response in answer to...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Why do nations trade? International trade enables a country to access goods and services that it cannot produce or are unable  to produce efficiently or at a realistic price. Task :   Write an extended response in answer to the following question: Why do nations   trade? Outline changes to, and the problems associated with, world trade and   globalisation and any justifications for restricting trade. Discuss the impact the current   economic crises may have on the global economy? 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Nations trade for the following reasons: Factor Endowments Absolute Advantage Comparative Advantage  Factor Endowments Each nation has a different availability of resources or in other words a different factor endowment.  There are three groups of factor endowments. These include human capital, man made capital and  natural resources. Below are some examples of the various factor endowments of different nations: Australia has a high level of natural resources like coal and iron-ore  Saudi Arabia has a large amount of crude oil Japan has a highly skilled labour force and a large amount of investment capital Vietnam has access to large amounts of cheap labour Countries need a certain amount of resources to produce the goods and services that satisfy the wants  of the various individuals, firms and governments located within the nation. A country may not be  able to access all the resources they require within their nation. So therefore they import these goods  from other nations who have these resources. Nations trade because they cannot produce all the goods and services they require because of their  factor endowment. Absolute Advantage Absolute advantage is where one nation can produce the greatest amount of a certain good or service  using the least resources.
Background image of page 2
Below is an example of Absolute advantage with the production goods of wool and wine within Spain  and Scotland. The figures are based on 1 unit of labour: Wine Wool Spain 75 50 Scotland 20 80   In this example Spain has an Absolute Advantage over Scotland in the production of wine and  Scotland has an Absolute Advantage in the production of wool.  Comparative Advantage Comparative Advantage is where one nation is relatively more efficient at producing one good than  another nation. This is measured by the opportunity cost of producing each good within that country.  The main argument for the promotion of free trade is based on the economic concept of Comparative  Advantage. The Comparative Advantage economic argument states that countries should specialise in  the production of goods which they have the lowest opportunity cost and trade with other nations, so 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 14

ACCT2542 - Task: Write an extended response in answer to...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online