Russian History - rather than by birth. Commoners become...

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Catherine II 1762-1796 Westernization vs. Revolutionary Activism
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Boyars (hereditary nobility) in the 17th century
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And 100 years later…. Count P. A. Tolstoy, c. 1722-27
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What’s in a name? Boyar -- боярин • Hereditary nobility who retain their noble status regardless of service to tsar’ • Compare to the gentry -- дворянин -- who rise through military or bureaucracy to attain noble status. • Initially, gentry status is NOT hereditary, but over several generations it becomes so. • Both boyars and gentry need to serve tsar’ to ensure their positions at court, secure new privileges, rise through the ranks
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Table of Ranks - Табель о рангах Established by Peter I (the Great) in 1722 Consists of 14 ranks of service either in military or civil service to Tsar’ Nobility are required to serve for life under Peter I; rank is determined by service,
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Unformatted text preview: rather than by birth. Commoners become eligible for noble status as they ascend the ranks Under Peter III, service ceases to be mandatory Peters Successors 1725 1727 Catherine I 1727 1730 Peter II 1730 1740 Anna Ivanovna 1740 1741 Ivan VI 1741 1762 Elizaveta Petrovna 1762 Peter III 1762 1796 Catherine II , the Great Peter III, son of Peter the Greats daughter Anna; Tsar in 1762. Princess Sophie Anhalt-Zerbst Later, Catherine II Grigorii Grigorevich Orlov (1734-1783) The triumphant Catherine II Emelian Pugachov Pugachev on Sokolov Hill [Saratov] , . Pugachov ajudicates Vasilii Perov , Pugachevs Judgement (1879) Catherine II Partitions of Poland, 1772-1795 Pale of Settlement Paul I, son of Catherine II...
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This note was uploaded on 03/22/2012 for the course RUSS 110 taught by Professor Barbarajhenry during the Spring '07 term at University of Washington.

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Russian History - rather than by birth. Commoners become...

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