Ansoft Designer Tutorial Amp

Ansoft Designer Tutorial Amp - http/www.mweda.com...

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Using Ansoft Designer to Simulate RF Amplifiers Characterized by S-parameters http://www.mweda.com 4-1-2005 Ansoft Designer provides a large library of FET transistor amplifiers characterized by their physical properties. These JFETs, MOSFETs, and MESFETs can be found in the Project Manager window Component tab, Nonlinear -> FETs. However, when designing amplifier source and load matching circuits, it is often much simpler to represent the FET as a simple 2-port network whose [Sij] parameters are specified at midband and at band edge frequencies. These values are commonly provided by FET manufacturers. The purpose of this note is to explain how to use Designer to set up and simulate FET amplifiers characterized by their S-parameters. Example 1 . Consider an X-band MESFET amplifier used in a 50 ohm system, and having the following S-parameters: Freq S11(mag)| S11(deg) S21(mag) S21(deg) S12(mag) S12(deg) S22(mag) S22(deg) 9 GHz .82 -145 1.72 42 .03 -18 .640 -109 10 .755 -162 1.65 26 .03 -19 .629 -122 11 .690 -187 1.67 17 .03 -20 .607 -133 (In Example 2 we will add source and load matching networks.) We begin by representing the transistor as a 2-port network characterized by its S-parameters at each of the three frequencies. We begin by creating a file with the S-parameter information. Use a text editor such as Notepad to create the following: http://www.mweda.com ADS,HFSS,Ansoft Designer 培训教程网 www.cadfamily.com EMail:[email protected] The document is for study only,if tort to your rights,please inform us,we will delete
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The four comment lines are preceded by an exclamation ( ! ) sign. The three data lines are the frequency (GHz), followed by S11, S21, S12, and S22. Each is specified as magnitude and phase in degrees.
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