Intro-to-crypto-89-656

Intro-to-crypto-89-656 - Introduction to Cryptography...

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Unformatted text preview: Introduction to Cryptography 89-656 Yehuda Lindell 1 October 19, 2006 1 This is an outdated draft of lecture notes written for an undergraduate course in cryptography at Bar-Ilan University, Israel. The notes are replaced by the textbook Introduction to Cryptography by Jonathan Katz and myself. There is a significant difference between the presentation in these notes and in the textbook (and thus how we will teach in class). c Copyright 2005 by Yehuda Lindell. Permission to make copies of part or all of this work for personal or classroom use is granted without fee provided that copies are not made or distributed for profit or commercial advantage and that new copies bear this notice and the full citation on the first page. Abstracting with credit is permitted. Abstract and Course Syllabus Abstract The aim of this course is to teach the basic principles and concepts of modern cryptography. The focus of the course will be on cryptographic problems and their solutions, and will contain a mix of both theoretical and applied material. We will present definitions of security and argue why certain construction meet these definitions. However, these definitions and arguments will be rather informal. (A rigorous treatment of the theory of cryptography will be given in course 89-856 next semester.) There is no one text book that covers all of the material in the course (nor one that presents the material in the same way as we do). However, much of the material can be found in the textbooks of [36] and [37] in the library. Course Syllabus 1. (a) Introduction: what is modern cryptography (what problems does it attempt to solve and how); the heuristic versus the rigorous approach; adversarial models and principles of defining security. (b) Historical ciphers and their cryptanalysis 2. Perfectly secret encryption: definitions, the one-time pad and its proof of security; proven limitations, Shannon’s theorem. 3. (a) Pseudorandomness: definition, pseudorandom generators and functions. (b) Private-key (symmetric) encryption schemes: Definition of security for eavesdrop- ping adversary, stream ciphers (construction from pseudorandom generators). 4. Private-key encryption schemes: (a) Block ciphers: CPA-secure encryption from pseudorandom permutations/functions. (b) The Data Encryption Standard (DES). 5. Private-key encryption (continued): (a) DES (continued): Attacks on reduced-round DES; double DES and triple DES. (b) Modes of operation: how to encrypt many blocks. 6. Collision-resistant hash functions: definition, properties and constructions; the random oracle model 7. Message authentication: definition, constructions, CBC-MAC, HMAC 8. (a) Combining encryption and authentication: how and how not to combine the two....
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This note was uploaded on 03/22/2012 for the course CSE 5345 taught by Professor Youngheliu during the Spring '12 term at UT Arlington.

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Intro-to-crypto-89-656 - Introduction to Cryptography...

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