Solutions-Crypto3e

Solutions-Crypto3e - SOLUTIONS MANUAL CRYPTOGRAPHY AND...

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S OLUTIONS M ANUAL C RYPTOGRAPHY AND N ETWORK S ECURITY Third Edition W ILLIAM S TALLINGS Copyright 2002: William Stallings -1-
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TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter 2: Classical Encryption Techniques. .............................................................. 4 Chapter 3: Block Ciphers and the Date Encryption Standard . ................................. 8 Chapter 4: Introduction to Finite Fields. .................................................................... 15 Chapter 5: Advanced Encryption Standard . ............................................................. 20 Chapter 6: Contemporary Symmetric Ciphers . ........................................................ 25 Chapter 7: Confidentiality Using Symmetric Encryption . ...................................... 30 Chapter 8: Introduction to Number Theory. ............................................................. 33 Chapter 9: Public-Key Cryptography and RSA. ....................................................... 37 Chapter 10: Key Management; Other Public-Key Cryptosystems. .......................... 42 Chapter 11: Message Authentication and Hash Functions . ...................................... 45 Chapter 12: Hash and MAC Algorithms . .................................................................... 48 Chapter 13: Digital Signatures and Authentication Protocols. ................................. 50 Chapter 14: Authentication Applications . ................................................................... 54 Chapter 15: Electronic Mail Security . ........................................................................... 57 Chapter 16: IP Security . .................................................................................................. 60 Chapter 17: Web Security. .............................................................................................. 65 Chapter 18: Intruders. ..................................................................................................... 68 Chapter 19: Malicious Software . ................................................................................... 72 Chapter 20: Firewalls . ..................................................................................................... 74 -3-
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N OTICE This manual contains solutions to all of the review questions and homework problems in Cryptography and Network Security, Third Edition . If you spot an error in a solution or in the wording of a problem, I would greatly appreciate it if you would forward the information via email to me at ws@shore.net. An errata sheet for this manual, if needed, is available at ftp://shell.shore.net/members/w/s/ws/S/ W.S. -4-
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C HAPTER 2 C LASSICAL E NCRYPTION T ECHNIQUES A NSWERS TO Q UESTIONS 2.1 Plaintext, encryption algorithm, secret key, ciphertext, decryption algorithm. 2.2 Permutation and substitution. 2.3 One key for symmetric ciphers, two keys for asymmetric ciphers. 2.4 A stream cipher is one that encrypts a digital data stream one bit or one byte at a time. A block cipher is one in which a block of plaintext is treated as a whole and used to produce a ciphertext block of equal length. 2.5 Cryptanalysis and brute force. 2.6 Ciphertext only . One possible attack under these circumstances is the brute-force approach of trying all possible keys. If the key space is very large, this becomes impractical. Thus, the opponent must rely on an analysis of the ciphertext itself, generally applying various statistical tests to it. Known plaintext. The analyst may be able to capture one or more plaintext messages as well as their encryptions. With this knowledge, the analyst may be able to deduce the key on the basis of the way in which the known plaintext is transformed. Chosen plaintext. If the analyst is able to choose the messages to encrypt, the analyst may deliberately pick patterns that can be expected to reveal the structure of the key. 2.7 An encryption scheme is unconditionally secure if the ciphertext generated by the scheme does not contain enough information to determine uniquely the corresponding plaintext, no matter how much ciphertext is available. An encryption scheme is said to be computationally secure if: (1) the cost of breaking the cipher exceeds the value of the encrypted information, and (2) the time required to break the cipher exceeds the useful lifetime of the information.
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Solutions-Crypto3e - SOLUTIONS MANUAL CRYPTOGRAPHY AND...

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