Bloodchild - Jamie Cox Stacey Suver Contemporary...

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Jamie Cox Stacey Suver Contemporary Literature/ LIT2081-02 14 March 2012 The Purpose of Relationships and “Bloodchild” Why do humans form emotional bonds and relationships with other humans and non- humans? This question could be answered many ways, because they want to, because they long for an emotional connection, for someone or something to talk to, to lean on, to use as support. Perhaps they seek out bonds for social reasons, to move up in the world, popularity and all that. But all of these answers have to do with the “I” figure, the self, to better one’s own life with not much thought for what it will do for another. Once the emotional bond is made, care usually goes both ways, at least in most all-human bonds (after all, there are no promises that a pet will love its owner back, no matter how much the owner loves their pet), but the primary thought, the purpose for continuing the relationship, whatever its nature may be, is more likely that not, to benefit the self, the “I”, the “what can you do for me?” These same rules apply for the Tlic in Octavia Butler’s science fiction short story,
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Bloodchild - Jamie Cox Stacey Suver Contemporary...

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