Lecture 2

Lecture 2 - HurricaneKatrina andNewOrleans Outline Outline

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Hurricane Katrina and New Orleans
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utline Outline eteorology of Hurricanes Meteorology of Hurricanes Hurricane Katrina New Orleans – a socially divided city Issues of class, race and poverty exposed by Katrina
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A latitudinal energy imbalance… ew Orleans Why? New Orleans
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Unequal solar energy at Earth’s surface The equatorial latitudes receive more energy than the polar latitudes… Why?
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Seasons are the reason… The region of peak heating migrates from the northern hemisphere in June to the southern hemisphere in December
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Atmospheric circulation and heat transport There must be a transport of heat from regions of surplus to deficit: from the tropics towards the poles How? Æ by winds and ocean currents and WEATHER!
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ater in 3 phases Water in 3 phases Water is abundant in the troposphere ater is able to change its state hase change Water is able to change its state Æ phase change Solid – liquid gas Requires energy Liberates energy
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tent Heat Latent Heat Energy lost by liquid water during evaporation is not destroyed (Law of Thermodynamics) It is “locked up” within the water vapour olecule that escaped molecule that escaped This stored energy is called “Latent Heat” Energy reappears as “Sensible Heat” when condensation occurs–a warming process
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tent Heat Latent Heat Important source of atmospheric energy H 2 O molecules are carried upwards where they change into liquid and ice clouds Tremendous amount of heat energy is released into the environment rovides energy for storms: mid titude Provides energy for storms: mid latitude cyclones, hurricanes, thunderstorms ater pour ansported from tropics Water vapour transported from tropics condenses at higher latitudes releasing and relocating energy to solve the latitudinal imbalance
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Vertical motion Air rises and sinks in response to temperature (density) differences ads to an exchange of latent and sensible heat Leads to an exchange of latent and sensible heat Clouds are formed by cooling of rising moist air, and bsequent condensation subsequent condensation Descending motion tends to suppress cloud formation Evaporation, saturation…
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orizontal motion Horizontal motion In order to reach equilibrium, air oves from areas moves from areas of High pressure, to eas of Low areas of Low pressure Wind!
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General circulation–Surface winds Surface winds consist of trades and easterlies in the equatorial and polar latitudes, and westerlies at midlatitudes
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General circulation – Tropics
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This document was uploaded on 03/23/2012.

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Lecture 2 - HurricaneKatrina andNewOrleans Outline Outline

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