PSY_103_OBS-early and late onset disorders

PSY_103_OBS-early - Introduction Introduction to to Psychopathology Psychopathology Alan J Fridlund Ph.D Early and Late Onset Disorders Early and

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Introduction Introduction to to Psychopathology Psychopathology Alan J. Fridlund, Ph.D. Early and Late Onset Disorders: Early and Late Onset Disorders: ADHD and Alzheimer’s Disease ADHD and Alzheimer’s Disease 11/29/07 Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) DSM-4 Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) DSM-4 Two Main Kinds: o Inattentive type-girls mostly o Hyperactive-impulsive type And-boys mostly o Combined Type Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Inattentive Type (need 6 or more): o Poor attention to detail, careless mistakes in schoolwork etc. o Can’t sustain attention to normal range of tasks o Doesn’t listen when spoken to directly o Doesn’t follow through on instructions, fails to finish assignments o Has difficulty organizing tasks and activities o Avoids, dislikes tasks requiring sustained mental effort o Often loses things necessary for tasks o Easily distracted o Frequently forgetful Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Hyperactive-Impulsive Type (need 6 or more): o Frequent fidgeting and squirming o Leaves seat frequently o Runs around or climbs excessively (in adolescence, feelings of restlessness) o Difficulty at quiet play o Excessive talking o Blurts out answers before Q is finished o Has difficulty waiting his/her turn o Frequently interrupts and butts in activities Who Has ADHD? Who Has ADHD? o Found in every culture and socioeconomic level o 3 – 5 percent of preadolescents have ADHD (range from 1-20%) o Males > Females: 3:1 to 9:1 ratio o Probable genetic link: concordances of 0.5 for MZ and 0.4 for DZ twins; 40- 50% of people with ADHD have at least one 1st-degree relative with ADHD. o Infants w/ prenatal complications, premature births, low birth weight o Infants whose mothers had high levels of anxiety during weeks 12-22 of their pregnancies. o Children w/ high blood levels of lead o Children who have had frequent changes of residence, whose parents have divorced, or whose fathers are irresponsible/antisocial (cause or effect?) Consequences of ADHD Consequences of ADHD o Poor school performance o ~20% of students w/ADHD have a concurrent learning disability o ~40-60% of ADHD children develop conduct disorder, delinquency and/or drug abuse o Up to 80% of ADHD children retain symptoms through adolescence o Only about 5% of college students w/ ADHD graduate. o Up to 70% of ADHD children retain symptoms through adulthood What Goes Wrong in ADHD? What Goes Wrong in ADHD? o Under-activation of frontal lobes o Abnormally low dopamine activity o Possible “sensory screen” o Abnormalities in sensing passage of time-50-90% of ADHD individuals also has at least one of the following: (it seldom exists by itself) • Bipolar Disorder (new pediatric diagnostic fad) • Conduct Disorder...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course PSYCH 102 taught by Professor Klein during the Fall '08 term at UCSB.

Page1 / 9

PSY_103_OBS-early - Introduction Introduction to to Psychopathology Psychopathology Alan J Fridlund Ph.D Early and Late Onset Disorders Early and

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online