January 30

January 30 - I Hopelessness Theory of Depression a Depression a.i Common Cold of psychopathology a.i.1 Projected to be the second leading cause of

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I. Hopelessness Theory of Depression a. Depression a.i. “Common Cold” of psychopathology a.i.1. Projected to be the second leading cause of disability worldwide by 2020 a.i.2. Lifetime risk of depression is 6-25% a.ii. Five of nine symptoms in DSM a.ii.1. Be affected for more than two weeks a.ii.2. Change in appetite, change in sleep patterns, anhedonia a.iii. Vulnerability Factors a.iii.1. Depression can have a tremendous impact a.iii.2. Tends to be recurrent a.iii.2.a. Once someone experiences a major depressive episode, more likely to experience another episode in the future a.iv. Diathesis-Stress Model a.iv.1. Factors that put you at risk for developing depression a.v. Titration model a.v.1. The higher one’s vulnerability to depression, the less stress is needed to produce a depressive episode a.v.2. Lower cognitive vulnerability = more stress required to produce depressive episode a.v.3. Level of vulnerability may fluctuate over time b. Hopelessness Theory b.i. Some are at high risk for depression because they have a
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This note was uploaded on 03/29/2012 for the course CLP 4193 taught by Professor Melissamitchell during the Spring '12 term at FSU.

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January 30 - I Hopelessness Theory of Depression a Depression a.i Common Cold of psychopathology a.i.1 Projected to be the second leading cause of

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