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103_16_full - PSYC 103 Winter 2011 Lecture 16 Timing Timing...

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PSYC 103 Winter 2011 Lecture 16 Timing
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Timing Periodic timing: the ability of animals to respond at a particular time • Circadian rhythms • Nocturnal, diurnal, crepuscular Interval timing: the ability of animals to respond on the basis of specific durations Why be sensitive to time? Control patterns of activity • Measure rates of occurrence
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Circadian rhythms Endogenous rhythms around 24 hrs in length…about a day. • Implicit representation of important events in the world, that can be modified by experience • Animals can learn about events in relation to their circadian clock • involves different mechanism(s) than interval timing Entrainment: process by which the underlying rhythm-generator (pacemaker) is synchronized with environmental signals -- experience dependent plasticity, calibration to the world Zeitgeber: entrainment signal (light is primary cue), other stimuli work too. Free-running rhythm: activity in the absence of any entrainment signal, generally slightly more or less than 24h
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