Characterization & Dramatic Strategies

Characterization & Dramatic Strategies -...

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Strategies  By Alyzay Sultan Ali 
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Characterization Strategies  A short film depends principally on character. Unlike long  films there is less time to deal with complexity of  relationships. Having to relate with a complex character is  relatable for the audience. Short stories and films tend to  develop more around complex characters telling their stories  and not on complex relationship between characters. There are 2 types of characters: 1. FLAT CHARACTERS  2. ROUND CHARACTERS
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ROUND CHARACTER A round character is a major character in a work of  fiction who encounters conflict and is changed by  it. Round characters tend to be more fully  developed and described than flat, or static,  characters. If you think of the characters you most  love in fiction, they probably seem as real to you as  people you know in real life. This is a good sign  that they are round characters. A writer employs a number of tools or elements to  develop a character, making him or her round,  including description and dialogue. A character's  responses to conflict and his or her internal  dialogue are also revelatory.
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FLAT CHARATER  A flat character is a minor character in a work of  fiction who does not undergo substantial change or  growth in the course of a story. Also referred to as  "two-dimensional characters" or "static characters,"  flat characters play a supporting role to the main  character, who as a rule should be round. Though  we don't generally strive to write flat characters,  they are often necessary in a story, along with  round characters.  Take, for example, Mr. Collins in Jane Austen's  Pride and Prejudice . A flat character, he serves a  vital role in the story of how Elizabeth and Darcy  get together, and he provides comedy, but his  character stays essentially unchanged. (In fact, 
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Characterization 1. The physical looks of character can help. The more  specific you can be about the character, the more likely  those qualities can be helpful in your story. 2.
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This note was uploaded on 03/23/2012 for the course MARKETING 206 taught by Professor Azar during the Spring '12 term at Lahore School of Economics.

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Characterization & Dramatic Strategies -...

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