WINDPOWER - WIND POWER WIND By Roger Rivera What is it How...

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WIND POWER WIND POWER What is it? How does it work? Efficiency U.S. Stats and Examples By: Roger Rivera
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WIND POWER WIND POWER - What is it? - What is it? All renewable energy (except tidal and geothermal power), ultimately comes from the sun The earth receives 1.74 x 10 17 watts of power (per hour) from the sun About one or 2 percent of this energy is converted to wind energy (which is about 50-100 times more than the energy converted to biomass by all plants on earth Differential heating of the earth’s surface and atmosphere induces vertical and horizontal air currents that are affected by the earth’s rotation and contours of the land WIND. ~ e.g.: Land Sea Breeze Cycle
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Winds are influenced by the ground surface at altitudes up to 100 meters. Wind is slowed by the surface roughness and obstacles. When dealing with wind energy, we are concerned with surface winds. A wind turbine obtains its power input by converting the force of the wind into a torque (turning force) acting on the rotor blades. The amount of energy which the wind transfers to the rotor depends on the density of the air, the rotor area, and the wind speed. The kinetic energy of a moving body is proportional to its mass (or weight). The kinetic energy in the wind thus depends on the density of the air, i.e. its mass per unit of volume. In other words, the "heavier" the air, the more energy is received by the turbine. at 15° Celsius air weighs about 1.225 kg per cubic meter, but the density decreases slightly with increasing humidity.
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A typical 600 kW wind turbine has a rotor diameter of 43-44 meters, i.e. a rotor area of some 1,500 square meters. The rotor area determines how much energy a wind turbine is able to harvest from the wind. Since the rotor area increases with the square of the rotor diameter, a turbine which is twice as large will receive 2 2 = 2 x 2 = four times as much energy.
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WINDPOWER - WIND POWER WIND By Roger Rivera What is it How...

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