472kiel - Economics and the Management of Ocean Fisheries...

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Economics and the Management of Ocean Fisheries Gordon Munro Department of Economics and Fisheries Centre University of British Columbia Vancouver, Canada
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Introduction World’s ocean fisheries are divided between a. capture fisheries –hunting fish in the wild b. aquaculture – fish farming While aquaculture is steadily growing in importance, we shall confine ourselves to capture fisheries capture fisheries pose a far greater management problem than does aquaculture
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Importance of Ocean Capture Fisheries Although ocean capture fishery resources have been subject to overexploitation, these fisheries have annual harvests equal 80+ million tonnes, with first sale value of roughly US$ 70 billion Provide direct, and indirect employment to as many as 200 million particularly important to the developing world
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Developments in Ocean Capture Fisheries There is clear evidence that ocean capture fishery harvests are reaching a plateau only increase through improved management That is not alarming –what is alarming is evidence increasing overexploitation FAO criterion: is stock at level capable of Maximum Sustained Yield (MSY)? (i) Stock at MSY level – Fully Exploited (ii) Stock above MSY level – Less than Fully Exploited (iii) Stock below MSY level - Overexploited
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Growing Overexploitation According to the FAO, in 1950 no more than 5% of capture fishery stocks overexploited –by the early 2000s, this figure had jumped to 25%. A further 50% are in the Fully Exploited category Fully Exploited is not Overexploited, but fear that many Fully Exploited stocks are candidates for Overexploited category (but see later) Recent work by Daniel Pauly ( co-winner, 2006 Volvo Foundation Prize ) and R. Froese (2003) implies that FAO may be understating the problem
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Global trend in the status of marine fisheries resources based on FAO statistics ( Daniel Pauly and R. Froese, 2003) Undeveloped Developing Fully exploited Overfished Collapsed 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990                                                                                   80 20 100 40 60 Relative status (%)
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Causes of the Problem How did we get into such a situation? What is to be done about it? We shall argue that economics lies at the heart of each of two questions • view now being taken by marine biologists, e.g. Ray Hilborn, University of Washington, another co-winner of 2006 Volvo Foundation prize BUT! economists alone cannot solve problem –capture fisheries management inherently interdisciplinary in nature
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The Economist’s Perspective All natural resources seen as real “capital” capital: any asset capable of yielding stream of economic returns through time capital, both human made and natural Can build up stock of capital through positive investment –sacrifice today, for hope of return tomorrow can also run down stock of capital -disinvestment
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Renewable and Non-renewable Natural Resources Is the resource capable of growth?
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This note was uploaded on 03/24/2012 for the course ECON 472 taught by Professor Gordonmunro during the Spring '12 term at The University of British Columbia.

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472kiel - Economics and the Management of Ocean Fisheries...

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