MGT501 MOD3 CASE3-Organizations as Brains

MGT501 MOD3 CASE3-Organizations as Brains - Running head...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Running head: ORGANIZATIONS AS BRAINS 1 Organizations as Brains: Learning Organizations and Social Networks TUI University March 26, 2012
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
ORGANIZATIONS AS BRAINS 2 Organizations as Brains: Learning Organizations and Social Networks A Learning Organization Defined In order to put the concept of an organization as a brain, which is akin to a network of nerve cells, a learning organization must first be defined since an organism equipped with a brain is also equipped with the capacity to learn from both its experiences and its environment. As a matter of fact, Nancy Dixon, as quoted by Farago & Skyrme (1995), aptly described the relationship of an organization and the brain when she said "The essence of [organizational] learning is the organization's ability to use the amazing mental capacity of all its members to create the kind of processes that will improve its own (Dixon, 1995)." Unfortunately, classifying the meaning of a learning organization into one neat sentence or paragraph is not that easy. Many abide by Peter Senge's official definition in his book titled The Fifth Discipline: The Art and Practice of the Learning Organization in which he states, "The fifth discipline: The art and practice of the learning organization" (Örtenblad, 2007, p. 108). Nevertheless, the learning organization has been identified as a key strategy and a valuable tool for both profit and nonprofit organizations to facilitate learning and knowledge management. The learning concept also improves organizational performance and assists in the development and enhancement of an entity’s competitive edge (Weldy, 2009, p. 58). How does it differ from the sum of the knowledge possessed by all the individual members of the organization? According to Watkins and Marsick (1992), a learning organization is one that is "characterized by total employee involvement in a process of collaboratively conducted,
Background image of page 2
ORGANIZATIONS AS BRAINS 3 collectively accountable change directed towards shared values or principles" (p. 118). On the other hand, Pedler et al (1991, 1996, 1007) defined it as an "organization that facilitates the learning of all its members and continually transforms itself" (p. 1). Of course, Senge defined learning organization as somewhere "people continually expand their capacity to create the results they truly desire, where new and expansive patterns of thinking are nurtured, where collective aspiration is set free, and where people are continually learning to see the whole [reality] together" (Senge, 1990, p. 3). Thus since an organization has a completely different mission and objective from all the individual members, the knowledge it therefore possesses and is developing could be entirely very different from the sum knowledge possessed by all its individual members. In other words, any knowledge possessed by individual counterparts that cannot be utilized in achieving the organization's objectives is not included in the
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/25/2012 for the course MGT 501 taught by Professor Dr.debralouis during the Fall '10 term at Trident Technical College.

Page1 / 8

MGT501 MOD3 CASE3-Organizations as Brains - Running head...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online