Phil 314 - Algorithmic Accountability Ethics Behind Self Driving Cars.docx

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D 1VDMr. SteinPHIL 314June 25, 2020Algorithmic Accountability:A Critical Analysis of the Ethics Behind Self-Driving CarsThe internet is a scary place. From a young age, the idea of internet being harmful has been implemented into our brains by parents, guardians, or teachers. Despite these claims, youngsters rush to establish their social presence through social media accounts such as Facebook, Instagram, or Snapchat. To utilize the services of these applications, we are required to share integral parts of our identity like our full name, date of birth, and location. We went frommaking 10 second videos on Vine to dance trends on TikTok, which shows that as the world progresses, so does technology, and this evolution has led to an increase in consumption of data by companies. In addition, marketers use internet cookies to track surfing habits and interests which can allow the browser to remember passwords, show relevant advertisements, or refill shopping carts upon revisiting a website. Due to such programs, our computer contains databasesof emails, videos, audios, images, click streams, logs, posts, search queries, health records, and more (Sagiroglu and Sinanc 42). The availability of the immense amount of personal data deems a frightening reality of technology understanding the ways of humans and taking over our planet,which can also be called an artificial intelligence (AI) takeover. A part of this process has alreadystarted with Google’s self-driving car project called Waymo. The robotic car’s mission is to “improve the world's access to mobility while saving thousands of lives [which are currently] lost to traffic crashes” (Waymo Homepage). Although would a car with special sensors be able to
D 2make moral decisions like humans? For instance, would a car be able to understand that a person who is jaywalking is committing an illegal act but should not be killed because of it? The moral ethics around giving technology control leads to the discussion whether robots should be allowedto make judgements about human life and death matters, and who is responsible when technology harms people. When humans are involved in accidents, the court does not question their instinctual behaviour, but when a robot is doing the driving the question of “why?” emergesas technology is often expected to be work without any flaws. Although, the cars cannot answer questions in regard to human ethical standards, so who should be held responsible? By focusing upon the question of accountability in relation to algorithms, this paper will show that creators ofcomplex technology like self-driving cars are partially responsibility when these vehicles cause harm, and show how increasing algorithmic transparency and reducing algorithmic bias help to provide a rational justification for a vehicle’s actions that considers ethical implications.The automotive industry is currently undergoing a potentially revolutionary change that could not only affect how vehicles are built but also reshape the design of roads and cities as well

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Automobile, Driverless car, EUREKA Prometheus Project, Mr Stein, Awad

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