Final Exam Review Sheet

Final Exam Review Sheet - Final Exam Review Sheet...

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Final Exam Review Sheet Philosophy of the Human Person Will to Power – Nietzsche. Power justifies our will to do things, not truth. It is the most fundamental life force. We want to be on top and exert our power. We want to assert our will. The drive for power is more fundamental than the drive for truth. Learned in context of master slave morality. Master Slave Morality – Nietzsche believed that there were two moralities that humans followed: master morality and slave morality. Master morality rejoices in here and now. There is no meekness in this life style; you unapologetically assert your will. Slave morality is associated with Judeo-Christian religion or any religion or philosophy that claims that what is good is other worldly. Those that live by the slave morality find passion suspect, and make you feel guilty for being who you are. The test to see if one was living by master or slave morality is the eternal reccoruance. “Are you living a life where that you are enjoying now?” “Imagine if you were living everyday of your life like you are today. Would you do it?” Existentialism – Nietzsche and Sartre. Existentialists deny possibility of objective values/truth. There is no God, no human nature, and no transcendent standard of right/wrong beyond you. Meaning comes from the individual. Religion cannot validate existence. Victor Frankyl: “why don’t you commit suicide” In facing that question, one sees what values and what goals one has in life. Existence Precedes Essence - One of the three theses of Existentialism. Sartre argued that there is no God, no human nature, and no transcendent standard of right/wrong beyond you. Meaning comes from the individual. Religion cannot validate existence. This contradicted Hobbes’s theory of the State of Nature, Freud’s tripartite soul, and Plato’s Theory of the Forms. Condemned to be free – Sartre. As a child grows, he or she discovers that his parents are fallible, that they are neither gods nor viceroys of God, and that the whole phenomenon of the essence preceding existence is a charade. We are free to create our own essence because no transcendent entity will do it for us. We are in a sense, condemned to be free. For example, consider morality. A student asks Sartre whether he should fight for his country by going to England to join the French Army or if he should stay home and cares for his ailing mother? Sartre simply answered: the student must create his own morality; he must decide on which principle to live by and then universalize it for all people. Theory of Evolution – Darwin believed that all life is related and has descended from a common ancestor. Humans, bananas, insects, and animals are all closely related. This was a radical theory that contradicted previously commonly held beliefs such as creationism, the great chain of being, and imago dei. Instead of having this predestined dominion over the animal world and being created in the image of god, we are actually close relatives of what we used to consider
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This note was uploaded on 03/25/2012 for the course PHIL 100C taught by Professor Penaluna during the Spring '12 term at St. Johns Duplicate.

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Final Exam Review Sheet - Final Exam Review Sheet...

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