Chap 3 Maxwell Part 2 - Chapter 3 Maxwell/Crain Part 2 T or...

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Chapter 3 Maxwell/Crain Part 2 T or F There have been 5 successive devices for selecting political party nominees used in the history of this country (80) False, there are 3 successive devices. T or F The first was the caucus, consisting of the elected political party members serving in the legislature (80) True T or F Texas’ first direct primary was held in 1914, under the Terrell Election Law passed in 1905 (80) False, Texas’ first direct primary was held in 1906, under the Terrell Election Law passed in 1903. T or F Texas, like many other states, has for decades required that “major” political parties- those whose candidates for governor received a fixed minimum number of votes in the general election- select their nominees through the primary (80) True T or F Since 1971, primary elections have not been funded primarily from the state treasury (81) READ TABLE 3.3 ON PAGE 81 READ OVER FIGURE 3.3 ON PAGE 82 False, since 1971, primary elections have been funded primarily from the state treasury. T or F A runoff primary is required in which the two candidates receiving the highest number of votes are pitted against each other (83) True T or F Primary elections in Texas are held in on the second Tuesday in March of even- numbered years. (83) True T or F The runoff primary is scheduled for the second Tuesday in April or a month after the initial party primary election (83) True T or F Turnout in Texas primaries is much higher than in general elections (83) False, turnout in Texas primaries is much lower than in general elections. T or F Party primaries are defined as open or closed (83) True T or F 11 states have an open primary in which voters decide the polls (on election day) in which primary they will participate (84) False, 7 states have an open primary. T or F Texas and the remaining forty states use what is legally called an open primary (84) False, it is called a closed primary. Only 2 minor legal restrictions make Texas technically an open/closed primary state: T or F 1. A person is forbidden to vote in more than one primary on election day (84) True T or F 2. A person who has voted in the first primary cannot switch parties and participate in the runoff election or convention of any other party (84) True
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Chap 3 Maxwell Part 2 - Chapter 3 Maxwell/Crain Part 2 T or...

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