17.5 Chapter 12 Lecture (Short Report)

17.5 Chapter 12 Lecture (Short Report) - Chapter 12...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 12 Continuation of Long Reports (pp. 380-394) Short Reports (pp. 394-412) Continuation of Long Reports 1. Findings 2. Five ways of organizing Findings (T, C, I, C, C) 3. Conclusions 4. Recommendations Short Reports Chapter 12 Pages 394-412 When to Use Short Reports 1. Short (1-3 pages . up to 10 pages) 2. Informal subject matter 3. Little background explanation necessary (few, if any, visuals or attachments) 4. Single reader Types of Short Reports 1. Periodic (Activity) Reports 2. Trip, Convention, and Conference Reports 3. Progress and Interim Reports 4. Investigative Reports 5. Justification/Recommendation Reports 6. Feasibility Reports 7. Yardstick Reports Short Report Assignment Occupational Memo Report (OOH) Assignment MGMT 3315 webpage Components of Short Reports 1. Introduction 3 items (see p. 391): Tells the purpose of the report Describes the significance of the topic Previews the main points in the order in which they will be developed This report examines the security of our current computer operations and present suggestions for improving security . Lax computer security could mean loss of information, loss of business, and damage to our equipment and systems. Because many former employees, released during recent downsizing efforts, know our systems, major changes must be made. To improve security, I will present three recommendations: (a) begin using smart cards that limit access to our computer system and (b) alter sign-on and log-off procedures. This report examines the security of our current computer operations and present suggestions for improving security. Lax computer security could mean loss of information, loss of business, and damage to our equipment and systems. Because many former employees, released during recent downsizing efforts, know our systems, major changes must be made. To improve security, I will present three recommendations: (a) begin using smart cards that limit access to our computer system and (b) alter sign-on and log-off procedures. This report examines the security of our current computer operations and present suggestions for improving security. Lax computer security could mean loss of information, loss of business, and damage to our equipment and systems. Because many former employees, released during recent downsizing efforts, know our systems, major changes must be made. To improve security, I will present three recommendations: (a) begin using smart cards that limit access to our computer system and (b) alter sign-on and log-off procedures. Components of Short Reports 1. Introduction 2. Headings First-Level Subheading First-Level Subheading First-Level Subheading First-Level Subheading Components of Short Reports 1. Introduction 2. Headings First-Level Subheading First-Level Subheading Second-Level Subheading Second-Level Subheading First-Level Subheading First-Level Subheading REPORT, CHAPTER, AND PART TITLES (p. 393) The title of a report, chapter heading, or major part (such as CONTENTS or NOTES) should be centered in all caps. The title of a report, chapter heading, or major part (such as CONTENTS or NOTES) should be centered in all caps....
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17.5 Chapter 12 Lecture (Short Report) - Chapter 12...

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