2012_Unit_2-2_Transcription

2012_Unit_2-2_Transcription - BIO 1140 – SLIDE#1 Unit 2...

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Unformatted text preview: BIO 1140 – SLIDE #1 Unit 2 – Information flow Unit 2 – What explains the variety of systems and their regulation? DNA RNA Protein The Central Dogma Replication Transcription Translation Reading Chapter 13.3,13.4 Chapter 14 Chapter 15 Objectives DNA Replication in eucaryotes What is a gene? Transcription in eucaryotes Translation in eucaryotes Regulation BIO 1140 – SLIDE #2 BIO1140 CELL BIOLOGY Examples of netiquette rules concerning peer respect (from Centre for University Teaching) • Be sure your device sound is set to “off” at the beginning of class • Stay on task. Activities such as Web surfing or gaming may distract classmates. • Listen to your classmates if they complain to you that your use is distracting BIO 1140 – SLIDE #3 Unit 2 – Information flow Transcription in Eucaryotes What is a gene? Up to now, we have considered DNA as only DNA. But DNA is organized into “functional” DNA and “non-functional” DNA (genic and non-genic). It’s time to ask ourselves what is a functional unit and what is a gene? This was a simple question but now is not so simple! The simple answer is “a gene codes for a protein” as in genomics. But does it? Why do we need to know? Because of “information flow”.- model that Watson and Crick made - and wondering how transcription occurs-- nonfunctional and functional - functional unit = transcript protein- genes contain non-genetic DNA - l BIO 1140 – SLIDE #4 Unit 2 – Information flow Transcription in Eucaryotes and Gene Regulation “A gene codes for a protein” The original definition was genetic and reflected the lack of understanding of DNA or RNA (i.e. phenotype). Examples are “unit associated with an inherited trait” “genes are the units of heredity in living organisms” “biological or basic unit of heredity found in all cells…” But soon after we added “molecular” information. Examples are “unit of information on a chromosome” “basic unit of heredity; a section of DNA coding for a particular trait” BIO 1140 – SLIDE #5 Original view of a chromosome Modern view of a “gene” & chromosome Unit 2 – Information flow In the jargon of molecular biology, the sequences that bind proteins needed for transcriptional control and RNA synthesis are “cis-acting”. The proteins themselves are “trans-acting” BIO 1140 – SLIDE #6 Unit 2 – Information flow Transcription in Eucaryotes and Gene Regulation Today many definitions are more explicit, at least from a molecular point of view: “a basic unit of hereditary material; an ordered sequence of nucleotide bases that encodes a product (an RNA * like rRNA or finally coding for a protein). The gene includes, however, regions preceding and following the coding region (5' UTR and 3' UTR) as well as (in eukaryotes) intervening sequences (introns) between individual coding segments (exons).” But what we would really like to know is everything:...
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This note was uploaded on 03/26/2012 for the course BIO 1140 taught by Professor Fenwick during the Winter '07 term at University of Ottawa.

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2012_Unit_2-2_Transcription - BIO 1140 – SLIDE#1 Unit 2...

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