WHAT IS AN INFORMATION SYSTEM

WHAT IS AN INFORMATION SYSTEM - facts representing events...

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WHAT IS AN INFORMATION SYSTEM? An information system can be defined technically as a set of interrelated components that collect (or retrieve), process, store, and distribute information to support decision making and control in an organization. In addition to supporting decision making, coordination, and control, information systems may also help managers and workers analyze problems, visualize complex subjects, and create new products. Information systems contain information about significant people, places, and things within the organization or in the environment surrounding it. By information we mean data that have been shaped into a form that is meaningful and useful to human beings. Data , in contrast, are streams of raw
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Unformatted text preview: facts representing events occurring in organizations or the physical environment before they have been organized and arranged into a form that people can understand and use. A brief example contrasting information and data may prove useful. Supermarket checkout counters scan millions of pieces of data from bar codes, which describe each product. Such pieces of data can be totaled and analyzed to provide meaningful information, such as the total number of bottles of dish detergent sold at a particular store, which brands of dish detergent were selling the most rapidly at that store or sales territory, or the total amount spent on that brand...
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This note was uploaded on 03/26/2012 for the course ITC 020 taught by Professor Abcd during the Spring '12 term at Andrew Jackson.

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