Exam 1 Info

Exam 1 Info - Info for Exam 1 Exam 1 8:00 — 9:30 PM...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Background image of page 2
Background image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Info for Exam 1 Exam 1: 8:00 — 9:30 PM Tuesday March 1st in Lily G126 ID required This exam covers Chapters 1, 2, 6, 7, 8, and 9 which corresponds to classes through February 16le and homework assignments 2 — 11. The homework problems, the Sample Problems posted on katalyst, and the types of questions addressed in class, are good examples of the types of questions to expect on the exam. There will be problems and possibly short—answer type questions. There will not be any multiple- choice questions. In order to receive credit, you will need to show your work on problems and to provide explanations when they are requested. Note the homework was not graded. Be sure to read the sample solutions posted on katalyst for complete answers. Important Topics for the First Exam Basic Demand and Supply Demand and supply functions Movements along a demand (supply) curve versus shifts in the curve How to find the aggregate supply function given individual supply functions Elasticity What is it? How is it computed [based on a demand function, for example, or based on an observed change in quantity demanded in response to a price change]? How is it used? What does it mean or what are the implications if it has a particular value? How is a point elasticity used to estimate a demand (supply) curve? Production Production functions Recognize special production functions [perfect substitutes, fixed—proportions (perfect complements), Cobb—Douglas] and their implications for optimal input choices and expansion paths. What is the marginal product of labor [capital], how is it computed, what are the implications if it has a particular value? What is the average product of labor [capital], and how is it related to the marginal product? Isoquants The types of returns to scale [decreasing, constant, or increasing] and their implications i i l i I s l i i Marginal Rate of Technical Substitution What is it? How is it computed? How is it used? What does it mean or what are the implications if it has a particular value? What does “diminishing marginal rate of technical substitution” mean and what are its implications for isoquants? How is MRTS related to the optimal input bundle chosen (for an interior solution or a corner solution) in the long—run cost minimization problem? Productive Efficiency What is productive efficiency? What conditions characterize (interior) productively efficient choices? Given information about a particular starting position [for example, MRTS values for a pair of firms], how could that information be used to determine changes that would improve productive efficiency? Cost Opportunity cost Sunk cost Avoidable fixed cost Isocost lines Understand the long—run cost minimization problem and the corresPonding cost functions Expansion path Normal input and inferior input Understand the short—run cost minimization problem and the corresponding seven cost functions Note the relationship between marginal and average curves; short-run and long—run average cost curves and marginal cost curves; cost curves and supply curves Supply Functions What is a firm’s supply function? What is a firm’s producer’s surplus and how does it differ from profit? Given a cost function (with or without sunk costs; with or without avoidable fixed costs), you should be able to find the corresponding supply function and producer’s surplus at any p. Aggregate supply for constant-cost, increasing—cost, and decreasing-cost industries Area under the aggregate supply function out to Q* as the (non—sunk) cost of producing Q* in the least cost way [given the available firms] —— Prdductive Efficiency is built into the aggregate supply function Height of the aggregate supply function at Q=i= as the “social marginal cost” of production at Q* Consumers’ Surplus What is consumer’s surplus? Given an aggregate demand function, you should be able to find the corresponding consumers’ surplus at any p. Area under the aggregate demand function out to Q* as the “social value” of Q* when allocated to consumers in the highest value way - Allocative Efficiency among consumers is built into the aggregate demand function Height of the aggregate demand function at Q* as the “social marginal value” of the next unit Competitive equilibrium You should be able to find competitive equilibrium price and quantity in the short run and in the long run as well as the resulting aggregate consumers’ surplus and aggregate producers’ surplus. What is economic rent? ...
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 3

Exam 1 Info - Info for Exam 1 Exam 1 8:00 — 9:30 PM...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online