9.26.11

9.26.11 - September 26, 2011 Domesticating the Human...

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September 26, 2011 Domesticating the Human Habitat How did Neolithic peoples domesticate their habitat? Post-Pleistocene Fertile Crescent: a place of wild wheat, rye, barley, sheep and goats Fertile Crescent: referred to as the hilly flanks Again… Pre-pottery Neolithic A o Villages of mud-brick huts included community food storage o Evidence o plant domestication is debated but wild grains were cultivated Pre-pottery Neolithic B o Thousands lived in farming villages of linked, multiroom homes o Interior wall displayed ritual symbols such as horns and skulls of ancestors o Rectangular mud-bricked house o Farming and food storage Habitat intervention in the Fertile Crescent Selection for tougher rachis and larger seed size to control harvesting Wild v. domestic wheat o Then rachis: in wild plants splinters and falls apart when seeds are ready for dispersal o Now want seeds to ripen so make tougher rachis
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This note was uploaded on 04/01/2012 for the course ANTH 123 taught by Professor Johnson during the Fall '08 term at UNC.

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9.26.11 - September 26, 2011 Domesticating the Human...

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