20th century - 20th century: Animal rights movement...

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20th century: Animal rights movement [ edit ] 1933: Tierschutzgesetz Further information: Animal protection in Nazi Germany This cartoon appeared in Kladderadatsch , a German satirical magazine, on September 3, 1933, showing lab animals giving the Nazi salute to Hermann Göring , after restrictions on animal testing were announced. On coming to power in January 1933, the Nazi Party passed the most comprehensive set of animal protection laws in Europe. [50] Kathleen Kete writes that it was the first known attempt by a government to break the species barrier, the traditional binary of humans and animals. Humans as a species lost their sacrosanct status, with Aryans at the top of the hierarchy, followed by wolves, eagles, and pigs, and
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Jews languishing with rats at the bottom. Kete writes that it was the worst possible answer to the question of what our relationship with other species ought to be. [51] On November 24, 1933, the Tierschutzgesetz , or animal protection law, was introduced, with Adolf Hitler announcing an end to animal cruelty: " Im neuen Reich darf es keine Tierquälerei mehr geben. " ("In the new Reich, no more animal cruelty will be allowed.") It was followed on July 3, 1934 by the Reichsjagdgesetz , prohibiting hunting; on July 1, 1935 by the Naturschutzgesetz , a comprehensive piece of environmental legislation; on November 13, 1937 by a law regulating animal transport by car; and on September 8, 1938 by a similar one dealing with animals on trains. [52] The least painful way to shoe a horse was prescribed, as was the correct way to cook a lobster to prevent them from being boiled alive. [51] Several senior Nazis, including Hitler, Rudolf Hess , Joseph Goebbels , and Heinrich Himmler , adopted some form of vegetarianism, though by most accounts not strictly, with Hitler allowing himself the
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occasional dish of meat. Himmler also mandated vegetarianism for senior SS officers, although this
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20th century - 20th century: Animal rights movement...

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