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1975 - 1975 Publication of Animal Liberation Further...

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1975: Publication of Animal Liberation Further information: Animal Liberation (book) Peter Singer 's Animal Liberation , published in 1975, became pivotal. In 1970, over lunch in Oxford with fellow student Richard Keshen, who was a vegetarian, Australian philosopher Peter Singer came to believe that, by eating animals, he was engaging in the oppression of other species. Keshen introduced Singer to the Godlovitches, and Singer and Roslind Godlovitch spent hours together refining their views. Ironically, Singer at first refused to contemplate actually becoming a vegetarian, though his wife Renata did so almost immediately after meeting the Godlovitches. However the logic of the position eventually persuaded him, and it was Singer's review of the
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Godlovitches' book in The New York Review of Books (April 5, 1973) that evolved into his Animal Liberation (1975), one of the animal rights movement's canonical texts. Singer based his arguments on the principle of utilitarianism , the view, broadly speaking, that an act is right if it leads to the "greatest happiness of the greatest number," a phrase first used in 1776 by Jeremy Bentham. He drew an explicit comparison between the liberation of women and the liberation of animals. [68] Although he regards himself as an animal rights advocate, Singer uses the term "right" as "shorthand for the kind of protection that we give to all members of our species." [69] There is no rights theory in his work. He rejects the idea that humans or non-humans
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