Roger Scruton - the human condition and it makes no sense...

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Roger Scruton Considerate la vostra semenza: Fatti non foste a viver come bruti, Ma per seguir virtute et canoscenza. ("You were not made to live as brutes, but to follow virtue and knowledge.") Dante , cited by Scruton. [7] The British philosopher Roger Scruton argues that rights imply obligations. Every legal privilege, he writes, imposes a burden on the one who does not possess that privilege: that is, "your right may be my duty." Scruton therefore regards the emergence of the animal rights movement as "the strangest cultural shift within the liberal worldview," because the idea of rights and responsibilities is, he argues, distinctive to
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Unformatted text preview: the human condition, and it makes no sense to spread them beyond our own species He accuses animal rights advocates of "pre-scientific" anthropomorphism , attributing traits to animals that are, he says, Beatrix Potter-like, where "only man is vile." It is within this fiction that the appeal of animal rights lies, he argues. The world of animals is non-judgmental, filled with dogs who return our affection almost no matter what we do to them, and cats who pretend to be affectionate when, in fact, they care only about themselves. It is, he argues, a fantasy, a world of escape. [7] [ edit ] See also...
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Roger Scruton - the human condition and it makes no sense...

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