Warning - Warning A venomous coral snake uses bright...

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Warning A venomous coral snake uses bright colours to warn off potential predators. Main article: Aposematism Further information: signalling theory Warning coloration (aposematism) is effectively the "opposite" of camouflage. Its function is to make the animal, for example a wasp or a coral snake, highly conspicuous to potential predators, so that it is noticed, remembered, and then avoided. As Peter Forbes observes, "Human warning signs employ the same colours - red, yellow, black, and white - that nature uses to advertise dangerous creatures." [11] Warning colours work by being associated by potential predators with something that makes the warning-coloured animal unpleasant or dangerous. This can be achieved in several ways:
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distasteful, for example a Cinnabar moth caterpillar has bitter-tasting chemicals in its blood foul-smelling, for example the skunk can eject a liquid with a long-lasting and powerful odour poisonous, for example a wasp can deliver a painful sting, while a viper can deliver a fatal bite Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Warning coloration Warning coloration can succeed either through inborn ("instinctual") behaviour on the part of potential predators, or through a learned avoidance. Either can lead to various forms of mimicry. [ edit
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This note was uploaded on 03/26/2012 for the course SCIENCE 103 taught by Professor Na during the Spring '12 term at American International.

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Warning - Warning A venomous coral snake uses bright...

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