Article Summary 7-Marketing and the Politics of Race, Language, and Gender

Article Summary 7-Marketing and the Politics of Race, Language, and Gender

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Brenda Chan 03/07/12 Article Summary In the article Marketing and the Politics of Race, Language, and Gender , the author talks about how the different races, languages, and genders played a major role in what became successful in American popular music. Within each category, there were distinctions on which race, language, and gender would succeed, which the author goes more in depth in the article. Although rock ‘n’ roll was a triumph of African American culture, African Americans did not necessarily become main beneficiaries of victory. Back to as early as the 1920s, popular music was categorized into three groups: race (African American music), hillbilly (white, working-class rural style), and popular (mainstream pop of the type produced by Tim Pan Alley). The identification of music with race intended to exclude African American artists and others from certain marketing structures in the music industry. At first they were all distinct styles, but social and cultural changes associated with World War II weakened these distinctions. Crossovers were also coming more popular at this time, which was the process of an artist or recording from a secondary or specialty marketing category achieving hit status in the mainstream market (like country, western, or rhythm & blues). There was a greater acceptance of African Americans in the mainstream market after WWII which prompted some changes in the music charting practices. As late as 1949, most African American artists were under the heading “Race Music.”
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 3

Article Summary 7-Marketing and the Politics of Race, Language, and Gender

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online