hip hop culture

hip hop culture - Part 1 Definitions and Ontology of Hip...

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Part 1: Definitions and Ontology of Hip Hop 8/23/11 What is Hip-Hop? Strategies for defining Hip-Hop -the socio-historical approach -left Bronx and expanded -identify hip hop with specific group of people the formalist approach -working with forms Difficulties in defining hip-hop Fatback, “King Tim III” (1979) -heavy bass guitar, live instruments -wasn’t meant to tell a story -Hip hop did not change a lot in its early existence Big Daddy Kane, “Raw” (1987) -pressed through bar line, resist square rhythm that early mc’s dwelled in -more complex rhythmically *Early hip hop recordings don’t have scratch noise Diddy ft. Jimmy Page – Come with Me Lil Wayne ft Drake – She will Using her partner to climb up the ladder Hip Hop has changed within past 4 decades Similarities to each song: -Rappers all brag -Heavy percussion -Heavy beat to each song -Beat is the rhythmic pattern that happens over again repetition Further Complications D-Styles “Beautiful Ugly Sound” (2002) Is this hip-hop? Or is it scratch music/turn tableist music? What makes it sound like hip-hop? The beat Yelawolf –“Looking for Alien Love” -no drums or bass guitar -post Eminem approach to white rap Is Hip Hop a Black American Music? -It began in the Bronx -But it has been produced outside of the U.S. Seeed “Ding” (2005) -White hip hop group from Germany Klashnekoff – “The Revolution” (2007) British -People tend to not to talk about british hip-hop, because anything not “American” is a knock off -But this is hip-hop 1
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People Say *Hip hop is a language of resistance How do we define what hip hop is? A third Option: The Stylistic Approach Style: shared formal characteristics within a group of tracks -As informed (but not determined) by culture and history -(sometimes) style entails treating music as an independent agent -talking about music as if it was an essential being Ontology -branch of philosophy -Studies the nature of being Principle question: Is there an essence to something? Does Hip-hop have an essence? PART II: MUSICAL CONCEPTS Temporal aspects: -when events happen with what frequency, regularly/irregularly -pulse (organize in meter) -Groupings of 2 and 4 pulses are very popular in western culture (because its easy to dance to) -meter -Rhythm (complicated organization of events happening within the meter) -Beat –particular rhythm that repeats over and over again -Flow – way of talking about mc’s delivery early hip hop flow = square Words fall within metric pattern Sonic Aspects pitch – basics of music melody- tune you remember chord – hear under the melody, pitches that occur simultaneously harmony – collections of chords, how they change evolve in a song instrumentation- instruments that produce a sounds in a work of music texture – way of talking about thickness or thinness of a song Big Boi- Shutterbug -Texture: thick lot of things going on, low & high in music -Referencing Electro dynamics – how loud or soft something is -Like volume PART I II; THE DANGERS OF DISCUSSING HIP-HOP Cultural Ownership -the idea that hip-hop is black music, for and by –People not black should not claim authority for it 2
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“What gives you the right…?”
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