Muckraking (1)

Muckraking (1) - + Muckraking, Progressivism and World War...

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+ Muckraking, Progressivism and World War I
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+ Coming up Muckraking in the Progressive Era Break Muckraking as petri dish for rise of public relations Image of PR practitioner
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+ Overview From the turn of the century until World War I, magazines introduced reform issues into the mainstream of American society With the onset of the war, editorial patriotism diverted reform energies to winning the war for democracy.
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+ Overview Citizens during World War I feared the massive changes in U.S. society, and responded to immigration, unionization, and a lack of ethnic homogeneity by repressing rather than extending civil liberties The Espionage and Sedition Acts created a legal basis for shutting down newspapers or for restricting their second- class mailing privileges, dramatically increasing the cost of circulation .
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+ Overview Most metropolitan dailies supported the war, often cooperating with George Creel's Committee on Public Information and rarely protesting as other newspapers were being repressed by the government.
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+ Overview On foreign fronts, the war also had an impact on U.S. news media. War correspondents, confronted with heavy censorship, moved from the front to centralized headquarters. Reports were based more heavily on military reports than on firsthand accounts, and issues of censorship dominated editorial decision making.
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+ Overview Electronic media had begun developing in the late 19 th century, and by WWI, the technology for radio and motion pictures existed. Motion pictures continued to develop through the war, but government holds on the radio waves slowed development of that medium. In the short the first 19 years of the 20 th century were a period of both great crusading journalism and horrific government censorship and “editorial patriotism.”
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+ Mass-Market Muckraking Magazine historians generally have described muckraking magazines as forums for journalistic exposés aimed at middle- class readers. They believe the development of these magazines reflected the era of national political reform that began around 1900 and continued until 1916.
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+ Muckraking Many individuals, including writers, were concerned about the direction the nation's economic growth was taking in
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This note was uploaded on 04/02/2012 for the course JOUR 201 taught by Professor Gutierrez during the Spring '07 term at USC.

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Muckraking (1) - + Muckraking, Progressivism and World War...

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