Document6 - Chapter 1: The Environment 1. Human Impacts on...

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Chapter 1: The Environment
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1. Human Impacts on the Environment Highly Developed Countries : countries that have complex industrialized bases, low rates of population growth and high per person incomes. Moderately Developed Countries : developing countries that have medium levels of industrialization and average per person incomes lower than highly developed countries. Less Developed Countries : developing countries with low levels of industrialization, very high rates of population growth, very high infant morality rates, and very low per person incomes (relative to highly developed countries). Poverty: is a condition in which people are unable to meet their basic needs for food, clothing, shelter, education, or health. It is common in LDCs. The increasing global population is placing stresses on the environment as humans consume ever-increasing qualities of food and water, use more energy and raw materials and produce enormous amounts of waste and pollution. Non-renewable Resources: natural resources that are present in limited supply and are depleted (worn-out) as they are used. Renewable Resources: resources that natural processes replace and that therefore can be used forever, provided that they are not overexploited in the short term. People Overpopulation : a situation in which too many people live in a given geographic area. Developing countries have people over population. Consumption Overpopulation: a situation that occurs when each individual in a population consumes too large a share of resources. Highly developed countries have consumption overpopulation. Environmental impact and the forces that drive it can be modeled by the IPAT Equation: I = P x A x T. Environmental impact (I) has three factors: the number of people (P), the
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affluence per person (A), which is a measure of the consumption, or amount of resources used per person; and the environmental affect of technologies used to obtain and consume those resources (T). 2.
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This note was uploaded on 03/28/2012 for the course ENV 200 taught by Professor Karening during the Spring '11 term at University of Toronto- Toronto.

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Document6 - Chapter 1: The Environment 1. Human Impacts on...

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