Stoney Butch Blues Paper

Stoney Butch Blues Paper - Shameka Kitchen Reading...

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Shameka Kitchen Reading Response: Stoney Butch Blues 02-01-2012
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Summary of Jess Goldberg’s Life As we look into the life of Jess Goldberg pre-Stonewall era, we see that her only hoped was to be accepted for who she was; granted, it’s what most people desire in this every day world. Jess introduces the reader by writing a letter to the woman who acted as a main survival mechanism for Jess’s life throughout her years of he-she affiliations, humiliations, and turmoil; the prostitute named Theresa. Femmes helped butches express emotions resulting from rape, mental and physical beatings; likewise, butches nurtured femme’s pain of being victimized as prostitutes. Through Theresa’s guiding and comforting touch, Jess was allowed to express her cognitive emotions of hurt, inequality, and guilt. During those times, her hope for survival depended on the love of other butches considered family, the astoundingly attractive drag queens she called friends, and the femmes she had as lovers. But going through life, however, Jess began to realize that she was not comfortable with herself identity; did she feel like a woman or man? That question seemed to be on her mind for the rest of her life. Growing up, Jess’s parents thought they gave birth to a child that trapped them in a life of marriage and misery. The reader sees young Jess predestined to walk a hard road in life because she was different. She did not want to be like the girls in the magazines, nor did she care about style. She also wore T-Shirt and Jeans to express her careless tendencies. Nobody could understand her non-feminine qualities or accept her mannish looks. Jess could never understand why people were always mad with her or why people were never satisfied with her selfless acts of kindness. She learned at a very young age that the world had already judged her harshly,
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unfortunately leaving her with a life of tears in mental solitude. These callous judgments only got worst as she began her long journey throughout the he-she life. Jess started to identify herself being a baby butch in the gay and lesbian world as a teenager. Finally, she could slowly be herself around people who accepted her. Butches alike embraced her, trained her up, and bestowed worldly wisdom on becoming a butch woman. The elder butches warned Jess about where her life was headed as the years would pass. Still, Jess felt herself improved by making the bare necessities; being able to go to gay and lesbian bars and feeling comfortable, dancing with a femme for the first time, dating a femme for the first time, etc. What she wasn’t prepared for was the first time she was beaten by the police, her worst enemies. Cops took advantage of these women’s rights to sex and made them feel dirty, leave
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This note was uploaded on 04/01/2012 for the course PSYCHOLOGY 3356 taught by Professor Mauraryan during the Spring '12 term at Georgia State.

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Stoney Butch Blues Paper - Shameka Kitchen Reading...

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