The Rise and Fall of Benign Narratives about Inequality

The Rise and Fall of Benign Narratives about Inequality -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Inequality Reader The Rise and Fall of Benign Narratives About Inequality There is a growing consensus among academics, policy makers, and even politicians that poverty and inequality should no longer be treated as soft “social issues” that can safely be subordinated to more fundamental interest in maximizing total economic output. We are to understand that inequality was always rife with externalities, howver,, inadequately we may have appreciated them in the past. Extreme inequality is counterproductive not just because other very legitimate objectives, such as reducing mortality rates, might also be compromised. The problem of inequality was understood, then, as a tractable moral problem, an unfortunate side-circumstance of capitalism (and even socialism) that would become yet more manageable with the transition into the increasingly affluent forms of advance industrialism. Enlightenment period resulting decline in inequality can be seen in honorific equality, civil equality, equality of human assets, and economic equality Most sociologists attribute the late-industrial decline in inequality to the increasingly crucial role that the skilled working class played in production, the associated growth in
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/30/2012 for the course SOCIOLOGY 3201 taught by Professor Miriamkonrad during the Spring '12 term at Georgia State University, Atlanta.

Page1 / 2

The Rise and Fall of Benign Narratives about Inequality -...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online