ISP 217 Review Exam 2

ISP 217 Review Exam 2 - Eutrophication Key terms...

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Eutrophication Key terms Eutrophication- an increase in the external supply of nutrients to an ecosystem that results in an increase in plant growth—kind of like too much of a good thing. Phytoplankton grows and then fish die Eutrophic- well fed/high nutrient input Nutrient- essential elements that tend to limit plant growth Essential element- fertilizer ingredients (C, N, P, Fe, etc.) “Limiting” nutrient- the one in shortest supply relative to need. We need to know which nutrient is limiting under natural conditions to understand the anthropogenic problem of eutrophication because the limiting nutrient is the one we must control to reverse eutrophication Carbon dioxide CO2 Nitrogen gas N2 Nitrate NO3- Ammonium NH4+ Phosphate PO4-3 Liebig’s Law— growth is not controlled by the amount of resources available, but by the scarcest one or the limiting factor Bicarbonate HCO3- What is the connection between the child doing laundry, and dead fish? o Chemicals in the laundry detergent get into the water system lead to eutrophication What are 4 elements that tend to limit plant growth? o Carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, iron What is phytoplankton? (besides a very beautiful organism) o microscopic plants that grow in the upper regions of the ocean where sunlight is plentiful. These small plants, which are composed of algae, are the bottom of the food chain for the entire planet. Phytoplankton require
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light for photosynthesis, so they usually are found near the surface of the water. Do plants take up organic, or inorganic substances? (understand difference of two terms) What molecule do they take up to get phosphorous (P)? o Plants take up inorganic forms of nutrients. They take up phosphate to get phosphorus Why does the growth curve (growth rate vs nutrient concentration) curve over? What is this curving over called? o It is a logistic function, its called a slope Why doesn’t reducing an essential element always reduce plant growth? Why do we need to determine which nutrient is limiting to control eutrophication? o To understand the anthropogenic problem of eutrophication because the limiting nutrient is the one we must control to reverse eutrphication Where does the C, N, and P come from (externally) in lakes? o Carbon/Nitrogen—atmosphere and watershed o Phosphorus--watershed How would you test whether a nutrient is limited using a laboratory experiment? o have a control then add nutrients and see if the phytoplankton respond by growing faster with the addition of the limiting nutrient Which element was it surprising to find was limiting in lake water using laboratory experiments?Why was this result not correct? (= How did the laboratory experiment not represent what is actually happening in lakes?) o Carbon. Its not correct because your testing a small amount of water in a controlled environment (glass bottle/flask) where the effects of the carbon cycle are less likely to impact the growth of phytoplanktin
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ISP 217 Review Exam 2 - Eutrophication Key terms...

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