Lecture 5d - Lecture 5. D) Children with neurological...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture 5. D) Children with neurological disabilities Epilepsy and Tourette syndrome Epilepsy- Described in terms of seizures- A seizure may appear as a brief stare, an unusual movement of the body, a change in awareness, or a convulsion- A person who experiences repeated seizures is said to have a seizure disorder or epilepsy- A single seizure does NOT necessarily mean that a person has epilepsy- It is possible for anyone to have a seizure if the conditions are right- Not a disease, but a symptom of a brain disorder- Brain damage isnt always the cause of epileptic seizures, but it could be- Some causative factors are perinatal conditions, early childhood infection and head trauma- Heredity is not normally a factor- Idiopathic epilepsy: when the cause is unknown- Symptomatic epilepsy: individual shows strong evidence of brain damage- Higher prevalence today due to a higher survival rate of persons with brain injuries- Classification o Seizures occur as a result of a temporary breakdown in the brains communication system...
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This note was uploaded on 03/27/2012 for the course PSYCHOLOGY 2043 taught by Professor Goldberg during the Spring '11 term at UWO.

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Lecture 5d - Lecture 5. D) Children with neurological...

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