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Aggression - Aggression Where does it come from Aggression...

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Aggression: Where does it come from?
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Aggression Definition of act of aggression difficult Distinction: hostile vs. instrumental aggression – depends on underlying motive Where does aggression come from? Biological factors (amygdala) Sociobiology
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What do you think? Wheel Aggression is primarily and inborn evolutionary response. Aggression is primarily a learned response that results from features of the culture.
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In favor of nature Freud – thanatos Evolution Animal Behavior studies
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Is Aggression Inborn or Learned? Freud elaborated on the more pessimistic view that brutish traits are part of human nature. He theorized that humans are born with an instinct toward life, which he called Eros, and an equally powerful instinct toward death, which he called Thanatos. Source of image: Microsoft Office Online.
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Is Aggression Instinctual? Situational? Optional? The Evolutionary Argument Males are theorized to aggress for two reasons: 1. Males behave aggressively to establish dominance over other males. The idea here is that the female will choose the male who is most likely to provide the best genes and the greatest protection and resources for their offspring. 2. Males aggress "jealously" in order to ensure that their mate(s) are not copulating with others. This ensures their paternity. Research supporting the evolutionary perspective is provocative but inconclusive because it is impossible to conduct a definitive experiment. Source of image: Microsoft Office Online.
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Is Aggression Instinctual? Situational? Optional? Aggression among the lower animals: Most people assume that cats will instinctively stalk and kill rats. Kuo (1961) attempted to demonstrate that this was a myth. He performed a simple little experiment: He raised a kitten in the same cage with a rat. Not only did the cat refrain from attacking the rat, but the two became close companions. Moreover, when given the opportunity, the cat refused either to chase or to kill other rats; thus the benign behavior was not confined to this one buddy but generalized to rats the cat had never met. Source of image: Microsoft Office Online.
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In Favor of the Environment Frustration-Aggression Hypothesis Changes in aggression over time Cross-cultural Studies
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In favor of the Environment: Frustration-Aggression Hypothesis Experience of frustration is the impetus to aggression Strong view: Every frustration aggression Every act of aggression results from some frustration Strong view not supported – reformulation aka cognitive neoassociationistic view has replaced it
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In favor of environment: Aggression and Culture Cross-cultural studies have found that human cultures vary widely in their degree of aggressiveness.
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